Flow Meters & Metering Systems
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Better Network Intelligence With Syrinix Total Head Pressure View

Several variables influence the pressure observed at every point in a pipeline, such as flow head loss from the reservoir or pump station providing the network and pressure intermittent events, to name a few.

When evaluating measurements taken at different points on the network, total head variations will quickly overshadow more nuanced details such as flow head loss or transient wave attenuation.

A ‘Total Head Pressure View’ is available on the Syrinix RADAR cloud-based user platform. This eliminates the static head’s impact from the pressure monitor, making for much better comparability of flow head failure and pressure transient events across different locations.

Clients who have multiple PIPEMINDER control systems in the same pressure zone will use the Total Head Pressure View function to quickly make and show changes.

Without needing to export the data from RADAR and manually balance the pressure from each monitoring point by the elevation of that location, users can view the data how they wish.

Pressures in a drinking water system can range from a mere pair of bars to over 25 bars. The Y-axis must be extended to reveal a bit range of pressure data, resulting in a reduction in the resolution of changes over the same axis.

Pressure data “squeezes” and makes differences in the Y-axis to be visualized best in a DMA without pressure controlling properties so the overall head should remain the stage regardless of the stage.

Utilities can get a greater understanding of how their network is doing by adjusting and incorporating site elevation to meet pressure shifts. Please contact us to learn more about Syrinix technology, our flow meter solutions, or the services we offer like on site flow meter testing.

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